Sympathique Agreement

Sympathique Agreement

As in general for adjectives that, for whatever reason, “do not sound like normal French words” (either words of words or abbreviated forms as in this case), dictionaries at least tend to consider them immutable — in other words, no agreement is ever added. So you would write “sexy men,” “nice people,” etc. In French, adjectives must correspond to the name they describe in GENDER (male/female) and NUMBER (singular/plural). In terms of grammar, the correct form of adjectives is referred to as the comparison of the adjectives with the substantives they described as an adjective chord. The agreement for adjectives depends on the actual number: if the whole form of “sympathetic” was used, i.e. “sympathetic”, it would in any case require an “s” to give its consent to the name in numbers: “they are not friendly”. If you decide not to agree on these adjectives, then you will agree with most dictionaries, then it will be difficult for a prescriptivist reader or thistlebottom woman of the teacher/examiner to decide that you are “wrong”. On the other hand, this choice is not really based on actual usage data – it`s just an arbitrary preference at the end of the day. He is very friendly and an ideal boss. He is very nice and the ideal boss.


yellow / yellow: yellow sincére / sincere bliss: stupid / stupid / stupid shy / shy: shy / friendly: beautiful For example, `nice` is a contraction of `sympathetic`. . It`s too bad a headache. And if you added endings, the result would be weird. The Spice Girls are really cold! green / green: green fun / fun: funny pretty / pretty: pretty French / French: stubborn French / obstinate: persistent names (the nouns) call people, places and things! . Words in other languages don`t always match very well. It is easy to use the basic form, but there is often no feminine or plural form to borrow with it, or otherwise it is forgotten in transmission. It makes no sense to try to add French endings to a foreign word. LEE: tired /tired: tired FEMININE: tired / tired: tired MASCULINE: bad / bad: bad FEMININE: bad / bad: bad ( Note, that there is also a tomb of accent above the first – e in the feminine form of this adjective) expensive / dear stranger: It is, to some extent, an acceptance or invention on the part of dictionary publishers and prescriptive grammarians, which is not based on real data. As Clare says, if you look at the actual use, you will see that – at least in fairly informal ways of writing — people, in reality, sometimes add the s. This is how people sometimes wrote “sexy men,” “nice people,” etc. Most adjectives add e to the male singular form to obtain the female singular.

Beware if you see male adjectives that end up on the lines “e,” “them,” “” and “he,” because for these, you don`t just add e. (Note that adding this e to a previously silent consonant leads to pronouncing this consonant. However, there is no change in pronunciation when adding e to a vowel.) A list of common adjectives in their male or female form can be found in Table 1.  I very much appreciate your help (in the hope that this does not seem rude..). Kaki (kaki) comes from Urdu (the language of Pakistan and parts of India), so it would be wiser to add the female plural urdu in this sentence. Any idea what it is? 
The man and the woman are American. The man and the woman are American. He is very fun and patient with the children. He is very funny and patient with children.